Tag Archives: standing desks

classroom

Standing Desks at School

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The passion with which many people responded to each of the articles on sitting and standing workstations was both surprising and gratifying. I didn’t realize it was such a hot button topic, but it is gratifying to know how many people are reading the articles we publish here. Analytics aside, it is sometimes hard to know for sure. I think the consensus of informed response was that a middle path is needed. The more variety, change, and adjustability in the user’s posture, the better the…

man sleep at desk

The Emotional Benefits of Sitting

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The response to our two articles (so far) on sitting versus standing at work, the first on standing desks and the second on a total reconceptualization of the workplace to support leaning instead of either sitting or standing was off the charts. Every LinkedIn group got responses from ergonomists, productivity specialists, and people with personal experience. We even got comments directly on the articles here on the EID site (which doesn’t always happen).

leaning workplace

Leaning Workplace

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I don’t know about you, but I find this to be incredible intriguing. I am not ready to say yet whether I think it would actually work, but it is certainly thought-provoking and a great topic for this week’s “Thought-Provoking Thursday.”

Forget standing desks. In the office of the future, you might lean instead—supported by giant rock-like sculptures that designers argue are a healthier, more active way to work than anything that’s come before. A prototype of the office design is now on display in Amsterdam.

Standing Desk

Standing Desks

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Standing desks seem to be one of those movements that have developed an irresistible momentum. No data needed. They instinctively resonate as a good idea. A no brainer. Why would we need any research to back it up? Sedentary lifestyles are killing us, causing obesity, diabetes, back pain . . . so standing must be better.

If it wasn’t already clear through common sense, it’s become painfully clear through science that sitting all day is terrible for your health. What’s especially alarming about this evidence is that extra physical activity doesn’t seem to offset the costs of what researchers call “prolonged sedentary time.” Just as jogging and tomato juice don’t make up for a night of smoking and drinking, a little evening exercise doesn’t erase the physical damage done by a full work day at your desk.