Tag Archives: organizational behavior

pattern

Industry Level Pattern Recognition

Read More »

I find the concept of an industry becoming “dematured” to be intriguing. I came across it in this paper in Strategy + Business. The basic idea is that many industries become disrupted not because of the stereotypical sudden change but an accumulation of gradual, prevalent, multifaceted, dynamic, interacting factors. These are just as hard to predict, even though they occur slowly, because we don’t notice them until our industry has been disrupted. It is a question of pattern recognition and change blindness, similar to what we see with banner blindness and the curse of expertise.

Dematurity is what happens to an established industry when multiple companies adopt a host of small innovations in a relatively short time. Those seemingly trivial moves combine to rejuvenate the old mature industry and make it young again.

clock

Design for Lateness

Read More »

We are all late some of the time, but there are vast differences in our punctuality behavior. Personally, I am obsessively on time. I am so averse to being late that I am usually 15 minutes early. I get to the airport hours and hours early, preferring to sit at the gate for 2 hours reading a book than to risk even a 1% chance of missing the flight. I have learned to bring magazines when I have a meeting so that I have something to do while I wait for others to arrive.

So I thought about this for a minute, and I think I figured out what’s going on. The issue is that there are two kinds of lateness…

Startup Brainstorm Meeting

Applying Human Factors to Organizational Management

Read More »

UX Magazine is always a good source of interesting ideas. Their recent article on using UX skills on the inside (i.e. internal management processes at work) seems to me to be something that we already knew, didn’t we?

Good change agents are nothing more than good designers. You already have good design skills. And if you are like Jane and trying to change things where you work, try applying those skills internally. Observe and you’ll make stuff happen. And by gaining a better understanding of the organization through this process, you’ll find yourself with more opportunities to affect bigger changes.