Tag Archives: intelligence

cyber security

Cyber Human Supervisory Control

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Vince Mancuso and his colleagues from the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base presented a paper on Cyber human supervisory control at User Experience Day last week at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society annual conference. This paper won the best paper award and received a $1,000 prize, sponsored by State Farm.

The paper investigated the performance of a human supervisor in cyber security applications and how this performance varies with an increasing number of autonomous cyber assets to monitor. They used the BotNET Operator Agent Ratio Determination (BOARD) system as the environment for the test and gave participants a series of missions to accomplish.

Eistein and chalkboard

Lifetime Development of Expertise

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For this week’s Human Factors in History, I went back to the 1920s to a book on the development of expertise. As you know, I am passionately interested in this topic. I am an advocate of Scott Barry Kaufman’s approach, which he shares quite extensively in his book Ungifted. But little did I know that a similar approach had been proposed as early as 1920 by Catharine Cox who had studied eminent scholars from the 15th through 19th centuries. Now THAT is a historical perspective!…

Nerd

The Illusion of Intelligence

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I looked back at my pile of papers waiting to be dealt with (Do you have a pile like that? I have several!) and I discovered a great summer topic for our psychology post this week. Back in the fall, Julie Beck published a literature review in The Atlantic that I think you will find intriguing. And depending on your ethics, perhaps useful. (That got your attention, didn’t it?)

Choose your own adventure: You’re at a party, trying to have a good time, when someone brings up War and Peace. Finding yourself caught in the middle of a conversation about a book you haven’t read, do you: (A) listen quietly, (B) leave the area, or (C) say something about the book anyway, in an effort to seem smart?When 2,000 Britons were polled last year about tactics they’d used to try to appear more intelligent, 62 percent of them confessed to having chosen option C.