Tag Archives: consumer

Smiling Trashcan

Friendly Trash Can

Read More »

This is a great example of affective design. For the unfamiliar, affective design is the integration of emotional considerations into user experience design. It can go in two directions:

  • Using biometrics or facial recognition to model the user’s emotional state and to customize the UX accordingly. For example we know that users who are angry have narrower scope of attention so we can provide more salient cues for peripheral indicators.
  • Using design techniques that intentionally induce a particular emotion in a user to evoke a behavior associated with that emotion. For example we can use design patterns that are associated with anger if we want to narrow the user’s attentional scope.

    The secret of success, they believe, is not just to devise furnishings that will do what they are told, but to give them personalities, convincing their owners that communication with them is a two-way process

Prada Luggage

Luggage 2.0

Read More »

If I were to ask you the top 10 features you would like added to your luggage, what comes to mind? Are any of these on your list: Bluetooth enabled lock you can open with your phone (so you don’t need to remember a code). GPS tracking (so you can find it if you lose it, it gets stolen, or if the airline loses it) Built in scale (to make sure it fits TSA limits or as an ergonomic double check for your back safety)…

a small wearable camera

Uninterrupted Lifelogger?

Read More »

I am a little intrigued by the autographer. Not as a product I would want to buy, I am not at all interested in photo lifelogging. But I really want to know what the conversation was like when they decided on the basic functionality.

Autographer is a new type of camera which has been custom built to enable spontaneous, hands-free image capture…

a man standing in front of a large vending machine

Commitment Device: Constraining Users for their Own Good

Read More »

Springwise has been reporting on a variety of vending machines that constrain user behavior for their own good.

Businesses often stand by the motto ‘the customer is always right’ — but are they? We’ve already seen a few services that deny consumers what they want based on their personal info…

a room full of airplane seats

Custom Airplane Seating

Read More »

Fast Company had an article last month that triggered an idea. The original talks about adjustable seating in airplanes that could be more customized than what we have now. They would be set on tracks in the floor so they could move back and forth. When you reserve your seat, you input how much legroom you want so when you get on the plane it is adjusted accordingly…

a pile of sim cards for cell phones

Global Mobility

Read More »

I have recently discovered the Daily Tech News Show and I have become a real fanboy. Last week, there was a great segment on how to get mobile access when you travel internationally. The conversation was largely n=1; they shared personal experiences or those they had heard about from friends and family. But these informal evaluations really focused on some key UX issues…

lots of clothing hangers

Simple but Clever and Effective: True Ergonomics

Read More »

This design caught my eye for so many reasons. The designer has a real user pain point that he wants to ease.

Maximizing space in a small closet requires a MacGyver-like resourcefulness. Luckily, the meccas of home organization (The Container Store, Bed Bath and Beyond) carry myriad tools for squeezing storage space out of every square inch. But when it comes to making clothes hangers more efficient, things get clumsy: Tiered clothes hangers, the ones meant for vertically stacking several pairs of pants, tend to be unwieldy, need to hook into place, and can’t accommodate shirts…

a purple robot

Robots and Personality

Read More »

I was really intrigued by this article in the Ideas section of the Boston Sunday Globe. It talks about the interaction between a robot’s projected personality and user acceptance. One of the things I really like about the Globe’s Idea section is that they cover the original research pretty well. Unlike some other media outlets that I have ranted about recently.

Smart machines need the right “personality” to work well—and experts are finding the best choice may not always be what we think we want.

a happy looking woman looking at her iphone

Delight: The Third Generation of HF

Read More »

Every once in a while, it is important to look back and take stock of where we have been. It is a critical part of understanding where we are now and predicting where we are going. This article from UX Magazine doesn’t go into the history, but it got me thinking along these lines.

Naturally, the chosen moniker of “Experiences” jumped out at us. UX practitioners have known for years what a lynchpin experience design is in the success and proliferation of a product or service, and the business world seems to be taking giant steps that affirm the importance of experience…

a boy staring at a computer screen

Marketing Literacy and Internet Privacy

Read More »

Annie Murphy Paul’s Brilliant Report this month has some interesting advice on marketing literacy. This topic is very related to our recent post on self-identity and the furor over Facebook’s secret research.

Many a parent and teacher has despaired over how easily young people’s attention is diverted, especially when they’re online. Stay focused! we urge them. Don’t let yourself get distracted! Our admonitions have little sway against the powerful temptations of the Internet. But there may be a better way to help teenagers resist the web’s lures: let them know that their attention is being deliberately manipulated and exploited…