Tag Archives: behavior change

a facebook notification

How Long Do We Have to Wait for Effective Notifications?

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I have been sitting on this topic for over a year. I finally am breaking down. After the CES show, I don’t see anything better on the market right now, but this idea for operating system–level notification modeling from Shruti Gandhi has given be enough hope to propose some ideas.

One answer could be consolidation. Snowball is almost headed in the right direction. Snowball consolidates all your alerts in one place.

a silhouette of a person with gears in the brain

Priming Mindsets for Learning

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I have talked before about inexpensive ways to increase learning (here and here). Here is another example for you. I am sure many of you are familiar with Carol Dweck’s wonderful work on mindsets. Brainpickings has one of the best summaries of her work.

One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality.

a small computing device clipped to a pocket to track movement

Fitbits for People with Multiple Sclerosis

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I have written before about wearables. They are a nice toy, but in general they don’t really do anything particularly useful, at least not with the current technology. This week, I read about a great application in health care, and I think it works.

Drugmaker Biogen Idec is exploring ways to use fitness trackers to gather data from people who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord.

a car crash

Modeling Driver Steering

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This research is not quite ready for the market, but has a lot of potential to improve driver safety.

The ability to predict what a driver is going to do in the near future and to be able to prepare the car’s system for this sounds a little bit like science fiction, and it would naturally be a dream come true for the safety departments at car manufacturers. The dream is now one step closer to becoming reality…

a pile of cigarettes

Addiction and Anhedonia

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I had never heard of the term before I read this article from the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest. When an addict is going through withdrawal, one of the symptoms of course is craving. Addicts physically and psychologically crave the drug they are withdrawing from. But anhedonia is the phenomenon in which addicts going through withdrawal also experience a generalized inability to enjoy other pleasures…

a string tied around a finger

Rituals and Symbolic Gestures

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In this season of the New Year’s resolutions, Jayashri Kulkarni from Monash University has some useful insight us to keep in mind.

In my patient’s case, unfortunately, I suspect her New Year’s resolution provided her with the opportunity to procrastinate. Despite comprehensive development of a smoking cessation plan, and extensive knowledge about the dangers to her health, she just didn’t want to give up smoking.

a woman looking at her cell phone while driving

Cell Phone Distraction is About More Than Driving

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There is a great new study from Bill Thornton out of the University of Southern Maine.

The mere sight of your mobile phone can distract you – even if you are not using it…

a man standing in front of a large vending machine

Commitment Device: Constraining Users for their Own Good

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Springwise has been reporting on a variety of vending machines that constrain user behavior for their own good.

Businesses often stand by the motto ‘the customer is always right’ — but are they? We’ve already seen a few services that deny consumers what they want based on their personal info…

children standing out in the rain

Performance and Climate Change?

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This article from the Boston Globe, citing a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research, has some more bad news about climate change. The study looked at how candidates performed on college entrance exams on days when the weather was bad. Not only did students do worse on the exams, but this led to reduced matriculation in college and even lower lifetime wages…

many small scale models of football helmets

The Opportunities and Challenges of a Concussion-Detecting Monitor

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Reebok has developed a product that represents a fantastic example of the KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) principle of design. And since I am such a fan of this principle, I want to use it as a subject for discussion today.

The product is called The Checklight and was featured in the October issue of Fast Company